Book Chats: Self-Coaching, How to Heal Anxiety and Depression

Sooo… I’m a little bit ashamed to say this is the first book I’ve finished this year. But, with that said, I’ve been on a reading kick lately so I’m hoping to blow through a few in the next couple months. We did so much TV binging over the so I’m ready to take a break (until Stranger Things is released). 

My first read of 2019 was Self-Coaching, How to Heal Anxiety and Depression by Joseph J. Luciani, Ph.D. Pictured is the first edition of the book, which is what I read because I found it at Goodwill for a few bucks, but there is an updated edition which is what I will be linking to here.

In this book Luciani goes over a set up self-coaching techniques for grasping control of our anxiety and/or depression and how to use the techniques based on what stems the roots of your anxiety/depression. If you are already in therapy for your mental health or perhaps you feel your anxiety/depression is something you could tackle on your own this would be a good read. If you are crippled with anxiety or deeply engrossed in depression, by all means give it a read but I think seeking regular treatment from a qualified professional would be far more beneficial.

Being someone who does not regularly suffer from anxiety or depression, I find this to be an incredibly interesting topic and I approached this book as more of an informative self-help read and not an life altering program I was going to implement immediately. That being said I think the self-coaching techniques could be useful for anyone as life puts us all in situations where we may come to question ourselves.

The section of the book where different personality types are broken down is by far the most valuable part of the book from my perspective. I don’t work in sales but I work in close conjunction with a sales team and one of the most important things they focus on when preparing a presentation for a potential customer is analyzing what the decision makers really care about – the bottom dollar, the ease of implementation and use, how a change would effect their employees, etc. Knowing how someone thinks is very important not just in sales but in most of life’s interactions. The personality type breakdowns provide insight into why people think the way they do which is a step deeper than how and that depth of understanding could make a huge difference in your interactions with others.

Overall, this may not be a read for everyone since the material isn’t exactly exciting in the conventional sense, but it’s a book I would recommend to everyone since I feel the material is valuable whether you suffer with anxiety and/or depression or not.

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